Commerce

Checkout abandonment: mobile UX examples to help boost conversions

It’s no secret that in spite of the boom in mobile web traffic, conversion rates from smartphones remain far lower than on desktop.

This is largely due to the fact that people use mobiles for research and searching for product ideas, before making a purchase on their laptop or PC.

The low conversion rates are mirrored by high abandonment rates, with new data from remarketing firm Cloud.IQ showing that during January the abandonment rate for smartphone users on ecommerce sites was 84%, compared to 72% on tablet and 68% on desktop.

The question is, what can be done to reduce basket abandonment on mobile? In truth a large proportion will continue to drop out simply because they use mobile for product research, however there are still ways of shortening the purchase journey on mobile so shoppers are nudged towards a conversion rather than dropping out.

To give some inspiration for mobile designers, I’ve rounded up some of my favourite UX features from various mobile checkouts that might help to limit user frustration and abandonment rates.

Enjoy!

How Nordstrom uses Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter and Google+

It’s been a while since I added to our series of posts looking at how major brands use social, so I thought it about time to pass judgment on another unsuspecting marketing team.

On this occasion the brand in question is fashion retailer Nordstrom which it turns out has a rather good social strategy, particularly when it comes to Pinterest.

This article follows on from similar posts looking at ASOS, Coca-Cola, Nike, H&M and Burberry, among others.

Enjoy!

How marketers can drive engagement at every phase of the purchase cycle

It’s not just the moment of purchase that matters. To successfully build customer loyalty requires fresh marketing strategies at every phase of the purchase cycle: before, during, and after.

Before deciding to spend their hard-earned money with your brand, consumers receive countless messages that detail product announcements and ways to save money. To break through this noise, a streamlined and efficient engagement strategy is critical.

At the time of purchase, on the other hand, with consumers facing options from dozens of competitors, brands must change the shopping game to aid consumers in making an educated buying decision.

Finally, after a purchase is made, your brand has a choice of either allowing the customer to walk away in anonymity or continue the conversation by creating an identified and meaningful ongoing relationship.

Tablet users expect desktop content and an optimized browsing experience: report

Tablets, what are they good for? Primarily shopping and entertainment, according to a new study into how consumers use their devices.

It found that two-thirds of US and UK tablet owners use their tablet for researching product information before buying online (66%), making it the most popular consumer activity.

This was closely followed by watching videos/browsing photos and checking prices or store information (both 63%).

The research by Usablenet confirms much of what we already know about tablets in that the devices are mainly used during ‘lean back’ leisure time in the home.