Skills and capability

Why companies should give digital marketers time off for training

No one can doubt the importance of enabling employees to develop themselves and learn new skills by attending relevant training sessions.

Not only does it improve productivity and encourage new ways of thinking, but it can have a positive impact on employee satisfaction as it aids career development.

However, in the day-to-day rush to get things done it’s easy to see training as a low priority.

Managers are under pressure to meet deadlines so feel they can’t afford to let staff take time out of the office for learning and development.

This is an understandable view point but one that is extremely short-sighted, as in the long term it will have a negative impact on productivity and staff retention.

So if you’re struggling to convince management of the need to allow staff time out of the office to attend training courses, here are a few arguments you can use to back up your case.

Client-side marketers earn more than their agency peers: report

If you want to be rich then you’re better off working client-side than in an agency, according to a new survey on marketing salaries.

Across all digital industries respondents working in-house earned more than people at the same level in agencies.

For example, the average salary for junior employees was £23,310 in agencies compared to £26,161 in client-side roles.

The gap was closest at senior level with agency respondents being paid £60,830 on average compared to £61,873 on client-side, but then the difference grew to roughly £20,000 at c-level (£95,212 vs. £114,199).

What are the essential skills for modern marketers? [infographic]

Looking to future proof your CV? Want to make sure your marketing team has the right mix of talent?

Our recent Skills of the Modern Marketer report defines the skills that senior marketers are seeking for their team. Both the broad knowledge areas and the deep vertical skills needed to be successful in marketing. 

As Neil Perkin’s blog post on the report mentioned last week, we also found a surprising focus on soft skills – in particular, adaptability, inquisitiveness and willingness to collaborate.

We created this infographic to summarise the findings of the report, based on interviews and a survey with senior level marketers. 

15 essential skills for modern marketers

What are the skills needed by marketers to be succesful in the future?

In our research for the Skills of the Modern Marketer report, we asked senior level marketers that question and have come up with 15 essential skills – organised into three ‘top five skills lists’ for marketing.

Why three lists? When we asked respondents about the skills essential to marketing there was a surprising focus placed on the soft skills.

So in addition to the usual broad knowledge areas and vertical skills areas, marketers need the right soft skills to be able to work across the organisation. The best ideas will founder without buy-in across the organisation and support from multiple teams.

Marketers also need to be able to adapt quickly in response to the rapid pace of change all around us.

So that leaves us with three top five lists, one each for soft skills, broad skills and technical skills.   

11 Econsultancy blog posts that marketers can use every day

Many of these ‘greatest hits’ don’t need flagging up as they are shared a lot and have probably been seen by some of you.

However, I wanted to group together a list of posts that are of considerable value, so you can bookmark, pocket, etc. and then use to impress your friends and win business.

Simple as that. Just click the pictures to see the original posts.

I’ve tried to include posts that won’t date, so I’ve left out Chris Lake’s web design trends post (which is proving our most popular this year) because it’s billed as ‘2014’. However I think it will remain useful past the end of the year, so check that out, too.

No one cares: three reasons your sales pitch isn’t working

The strongest aspect of the roundtables Econsultancy runs around the world is that marketers drive the conversation. If they want to jump from emerging trends to what annoys them about digital marketing sales pitches, we’re happy to sit back and learn something.

That’s just what happened at one of our South by Southwest roundtables, co-hosted by Rapp and Adometry. What emerged was the start of this list of dos and don’ts that we hope will help save time and sanity on both sides of the table.

In this post, client-side marketers share their unvarnished advice on how digital marketing sales people should improve their pitches.

in-house

Marketers doing more in-house: the trend no-one talks about?

Achieving the right balance between building in-house capability and outsourcing is one of the defining questions of modern marketing.

Research conducted for Econsultancy’s new Best Practice Guide to Insourcing and Outsourcing indicates that this is an ever-shifting dynamic.  

When combined with variations by sector and digital maturity, it means greater complexity for marketers and greater difficulty in establishing exactly what good looks like.

Avoiding ecommerce deployment disaster: 10 areas to watch

Replatforming and deploying major updates are some of the most stressful moments for an ecommerce team.  

These moments are vital for staying ahead of the competition, for introducing innovative new features or responding to user testing, but they’re also the point at which things can go most wrong

Too often when you or your agency throw the hypothetical switch you end up with a site that’s got serious bugs or, even worse, no site at all.  

What can you do to ensure that the deployment of your new platform, or of important revisions to your existing one, run seamlessly and effectively?